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SigMaker

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SigMaker is a quick way to put signatures, logos or other scanned characters in OpenType or TrueType fonts. You can add characters to existing fonts, create tiny one-glyph fonts (fontlets) or create Adobe InDesign-compatible SING glyphlets. May 2008: Now available in English, German, French, Spanish, Japanese and Chinese languages!

 

SigMaker

Put images, signatures and logos into fonts.

6 simple steps:

Step 1. Select a font in which to include your signature or graphic. You can select a font that is installed on your system of any OpenType or TrueType font file.

Step 2. Next open the saved image of your signature or logo and make any changes you wish (invert, crop, rotate).

Step 3. Choose a character position (keystroke on your keyboard) to represent your new character.

Step 4. Adjust the dimensions of the image to fit the other characters in the font.

Step 5. Adjust the name of the font by adding a prefix or suffix, indicating that this is the modified version of the font.

Step 6. Save a modified font, a new one-glyph fontlet or a SING glyphlet, and you're done!

Learn more about SigMaker

 
CompoCompiler

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CompoCompiler adds accented characters to fonts.

CompoCompiler

Compo compiler uses a special command file (a text file with a very simple structure) and applies it to your selected fonts to add composites. Plus — you can build command files automatically in Compo Compiler using any font file as a source of composite information. For example, you can take Arial or Lucida Unicode and build a command file with information about all the composites in these files and then apply this command file to any of your fonts. The positions of the components in the command file are defined relatively, so command files work with almost any font, independent of the characters' proportions.  

Learn more about CompoCompiler